China claims breakthrough in mining 'flammable ice'

China claims breakthrough in mining 'flammable ice'

China has for the first time extracted gas from an ice-like substance under the South China Sea considered key to future global energy supply.

Chinese authorities have described the success as a major breakthrough.

Methane hydrates, also called "flammable ice", hold vast reserves of natural gas.

Many countries including the US and Japan are working on how to tap those reserves, but mining and extracting are extremely difficult.

The crux, though, is that extracting the gas is extremely difficult and energy consuming.

Methane hydrates were discovered in Russia's north in the 1960s, but research into how to extract gas from them from maritime sediment only began in the last 10 to 15 years.

As a country lacking any natural energy resources, Japan has been a pioneer in the field. Other leading countries are India or South Korea - who also don't have their own oil reserves.

While the US and Canada are also active in the field, they have been focussing on hydrates under permafrost in the far north of Alaska and Canada.

Methane hydrates are thought to have the potential to be a revolutionary energy source that could be key to future energy needs - likely the world's last great source of carbon-based fuel.

Vast deposits exist basically underneath all oceans around the the globe, especially on the edge of continental shelves. Countries are scrambling for a way to make the extraction safe and profitable.

China describes its latest results as a breakthrough and Mr Linga agrees. "Compared with the results we have seen from Japanese research, the Chinese scientists have managed to extract much more gas in their efforts."

"So in that sense it is indeed a major step towards making gas extraction from methane hydrates viable."

It's thought that there is as much as 10 times the amount of gas in methane hydrates than in shale for instance. "And that's by conservative estimates," says Prof Linga.

China claims breakthrough in mining 'flammable ice'

China discovered flammable ice in the South China Sea in 2007.

Nestled between between China, Vietnam and the Philippines, the South China Sea has in recent years been an increasingly contentious issue, with Beijing claiming sole sovereignty over it - and hence rights to all natural reserves hidden under its surface.

While indeed a breakthrough, China's success is still only one step on a long journey, Prof Linga explains.

"It is the first time that production rates actually seem promising," he says. "But it's thought that only by 2025 at the earliest we might be able to look at realistic commercial options."

An average of 16,000 cubic meters of gas with high purity have been extracted per day in the Shenhu area of the South China Sea, according to Chinese media.

But Mr Linga also cautions that any exploitation of the reserves must be done with the utmost care because of environmental concerns.

The potential threat is that methane can escape, which would have serious consequences for global warming. It is a gas that has a much higher potential to impact climate change than carbon dioxide.

So the trick is to extract the gas without any of it slipping out.



Add Comment

all comments

  Other news

more
Going off-grid

Going off-grid..

26-May, 18:48

The couple, who have 16 pets, grow all their fruit, vegetables and herbs,...

‘Internet battlefield’: Theresa May calls on G7 leaders to fight online extremism

‘Internet battlefield’: Theresa May calls on G7 leaders to fight online extremism..

26-May, 12:32

British Prime Minister Theresa May will call on fellow G7 leaders to put...

Sunstroke suspected over baby death in car

Sunstroke suspected over baby death in car..

26-May, 08:24

A post-mortem examination is expected to take place on Friday after the...

Controlling 3-D behavior of biological cells using laser holographic techniques

Controlling 3-D behavior of biological cells using laser holographic techniques..

26-May, 17:26

A research team led by Professor YongKeun Park of the Physics Department...

Ethics office raised questions about Ivanka Trump before she joined WH

Ethics office raised questions about Ivanka Trump before she joined WH..

01-May, 13:08

The Office of Government Ethics raised concerns about Ivanka Trump’s...

Researchers discover caterpillars that can chew and breakdown plastic

Researchers discover caterpillars that can chew and breakdown plastic..

26-Apr, 07:16

Since plastic was invented, figuring out how to get rid of the stuff...

Volkswagen plans all-electric car for China next year

Volkswagen plans all-electric car for China next year..

18-Apr, 06:00

Volkswagen, Europe's biggest automaker, plans to launch its first...

EU Slaps China, Taiwan With Steel Anti-Dumping Duties

EU Slaps China, Taiwan With Steel Anti-Dumping Duties..

27-Jan, 08:21

The European Commission has imposed anti-dumping duties on steel products...